Eco-Adventures

Hiking Nature Trails and WaterFalls.

St. Vincent and the Grenadines (SVG) natural surroundings are still untouched by development and are a great backdrop for Eco-Adventure experiences. Hikers can trek to an active volcano, to secluded waterfalls for a quick dip or to uncrowded pristine beaches hidden by lush foliage. Jeep safaris, bike trips and walking tours thrust explorers into parts of the islands that few people have ever laid eyes upon. The beaches, black, gold or white sand, are natural experiences in their own right, with long deserted shorelines dotted by palm trees to explore. 

As the largest of the islands, St. Vincent has the most to offer in the way of land-based natural attractions. From hiking trails to historic gardens, the activities here practically demand that eco-tourists spend at least a day or two exploring the island’s interior.

Hiking to La Soufriere is a must-do hike

Hiking La Soufriere Volcano

At over 4,000 feet above sea level, the active La Soufriere volcano dominates the landscape of mainland St Vincent. It has long captured the imagination of adventure seekers with the famed Daniel Defoe, author of Robinson Crusoe the adventure novel, writing about its majesty in the Myst Journal, 1718.  La Soufriere experienced a series of explosive eruptions from 9th April 2021 and is currently deemed out of its explosive phase. However, explorers are discouraged from hiking until further notice by the local authorities.

Vermont Nature Trail

Cutting a path through the Grand Bonhomme Mountain in the south of St Vincent, the Vermont Nature Trail is an excellent spot for both hiking and nature watching. The trail consists of a network of loops on the mountain, which go through both evergreen and tropical rainforests. Some of the island’s dense vegetation and meandering streams are on full display and hikers may be able to spot some of the island’s bird species like the endangered St Vincent Parrot.

Thanks to St. Vincent’s wealth of inland waterfalls, hikers can enjoy rewards of a different kind at the end of their trails. Trinity Falls, sitting at about a 30-minute hike into the forest, features three separate cascades, 40 ft. in total, flowing into a serene circular swimming pool before another 10 ft. drop into a second natural spot for a swim.

Dark View Falls

At over 4,000 feet above sea level, the active La Soufriere volcano dominates the landscape of mainland St Vincent. It has long captured the imagination of adventure seekers with the famed Daniel Defoe, author of Robinson Crusoe the adventure novel, writing about its majesty in the Myst Journal, 1718.  La Soufriere experienced a series of explosive eruptions from 9th April 2021 and is currently deemed out of its explosive phase. However, explorers are discouraged from hiking until further notice by the local authorities.

Cumberland Nature Trail

Cutting a path through the Grand Bonhomme Mountain in the south of St Vincent, the Vermont Nature Trail is an excellent spot for both hiking and nature watching. The trail consists of a network of loops on the mountain, which go through both evergreen and tropical rainforests. Some of the island’s dense vegetation and meandering streams are on full display and hikers may be able to spot some of the island’s bird species like the endangered St Vincent Parrot.

Thanks to St. Vincent’s wealth of inland waterfalls, hikers can enjoy rewards of a different kind at the end of their trails. Trinity Falls, sitting at about a 30-minute hike into the forest, features three separate cascades, 40 ft. in total, flowing into a serene circular swimming pool before another 10 ft. drop into a second natural spot for a swim.

Bird Watching

SVG has been blessed with an abundance of bird species-there is nothing quite like seeing parrots in full flight and when they are as unique as the St Vincent Parrot, you simply cannot beat it. Observe hummingbirds, whistling warblers and a host of endemic and migratory species.

Amazona Guildingii, also known as the St Vincent Parrot, is the national bird of SVG. The endemic parrot can be seen at the Botanical Gardens on the outskirts of Kingstown. However, for those who like to observe birds in the wild it is best to venture into the lush forests. There are an estimated 500 parrots living in the interior of St Vincent and one of the very best places to see them is at the Vermont Nature Trail. Dusk and dawn are the prime times to spot them at the Vermont Nature Trail. As you near the Parrot Lookout on the far side of the trail, listen for their calls before catching sight of them flying across the forest canopy in front of you. 

Another endemic bird you may hear in the forest setting is the Whistling Warbler (Catharopeza Bishopi), a small, black bird that flitters around the undergrowth. Regionally endemic birds that you may encounter at the trails are: the Antillean Crested Hummingbird; the Purple Throated Carib; the Lesser Antillean Tanager; the Brown Trembler; and the Rufous Throated Solitaire. 

Along our coasts, ponds, mangroves, and hovering high above the inshore waters of the Grenadines look out for the Magnificent Frigate bird, the White-Tailed Tropic bird, Terns, Egrets, Herons and the occasional Glossy Ibis. Over 170 species of resident and migratory birds have been recorded in St Vincent and the Grenadines, making our islands an interesting and beautiful destination for professional ornithologists and amateur birders.

Birding Tours and Guides

Avian Eyes Birding Group 

T: +1 (784) 593-3763 
E: avianeyes@hotmail.com
W: http://www.avianeyes.org 

Science Initiative for Environmental Conservation and Education (SCIENCE)

Botanic Gardens
T: +1 (784) 593-3763 
E: lyst72culzac-wilson@hotmail.com

Tropical Gardens

Botanic Gardens (St Vincent)

Located on 20 acres of land on the outskirts of the capital Kingstown, the Botanic Gardens are the oldest of their kind in the Western Hemisphere. Among the wide variety of tropical trees and shrubs is a breadfruit tree from the original plant brought to the country by Captain Bligh (of The Bounty fame) in 1793. Conservation of rare species of plants has been practised since the Gardens were founded in 1765. Other conservation works involve the national bird, the St Vincent Parrot (Amazona Guildingii). Facilities offered here are washrooms, a small performance area, gazebos, refreshment and craft sales. The Gardens are a popular spot for wedding ceremonies.

Montreal Gardens (St Vincent)

Located in the mountains above the Mesopotamia Valley, the Montreal Gardens estate is blessed with fertile volcanic soil and frequent rainfall. You will find an array of exotic flowers, animals and plants in an environment which is cool, misty and quiet. The Gardens are open to the public for a small entrance fee

Beaches and Salt Ponds

Owia Salt Pond (St Vincent)

Owia is home to many of St Vincent’s Carib people and among its many attractions is the Owia Salt Pond. Situated close to the black sand beach and formed from the dark volcanic rock, the Pond is like a natural private sauna that allows you to enjoy the warm waters of the Atlantic without the choppy waves. The drive to the Owia Salt Pond takes you along the island’s magnificent east coast.

Brighton Salt Pond (St Vincent)

A black sand beach with mangrove swamp, Brighton Salt Pond is located on the south-eastern tip of St Vincent. Brighton Pond attracts many visitors and is a popular recreational and entertainment spot. Activities include sea bathing, picnicking, fishing, parties or just taking in the picturesque views of the Grenadines. The site was developed by a group calling itself the Brighton Beach Roller – a voluntary community group that operates a bar, rest house and other facilities in the area.

Rawacou Recreation Park (St Vincent)

A major recreational spot, Rawacou Recreational Park includes two beaches separated by a rocky headland with a man made pool. A dune system provides protection at the shoreline against the waves of Rawacou Bay. Facilities at this site include vending units, events and performance area, parking, gazebos, washrooms and change rooms. Sea bathing is not encouraged. Visitors to this site are asked instead to use the man-made pool.